ENG 2010: American Literature II

Description

ENG 2010 surveys the emergence of modern American literature from the latter half of the nineteenth century, through the social challenges experienced in the twentieth century before and after World Wars I & II, and into the postmodern era that ushered in the 21st century. This course is designed to help students study American literary works and analyze their literary significance. Emphasis is placed on representative works and writers of the periods covered, and on the literary, cultural, historical, and philosophical forces that shaped these works and are reflected in them. Prerequisite: EH 1020 or equivalent.

Outcomes

1.       Describe the rise of realism, its characteristics, and provide American literary examples.

2.       Analyze the relationship between the literature of local color and realism.

3.       Analyze how realism gave rise to naturalism, describing the characteristics of naturalism, and providing American literary examples.

4.       Explain why writers of the postwar era following the end of World War I came to be described as the “Lost Generation,” devoid of faith and alienated from a civilization that was “botched,” as Ezra Pound described it.

5.       Analyze how the publication in 1922 of T. S. Eliot’s The Waste Land, perhaps the most significant American poem of the twentieth century, helped to establish a modern tradition of literature rich with learning and symbolism.

6.       Analyze the emergence of new American dramatists after World War I and provide characteristics of specific works.

7.       Identify and analyze the emergence of “modernism,” and discuss specific representative literary works.

8.       Discuss the twentieth century rebirth of African American writing through the Harlem Literary Renaissance of the 1920s and up to the current time.

9.       Assess the appearance of the anti-hero in Post WWII American fiction.

10.   Analyze the rise of drama in the post-World War II U.S., discussing the characteristics and providing specific examples.

11.   Discuss how post-World War II American fiction returned to the skeptical, ironic tradition of the earlier realists and naturalists.

12.   Discuss the impact of women writers on post-World War II American literature, providing specific examples from published works.

Prerequisites

ENG 1020

Textbook(s)

None

* Disclaimer: Textbooks listed are based on the last open revision of the course. Prior revisions and future revisions may use different textbooks. To verify textbook information, view the course syllabus or contact Student Services at students@waldorf.edu


ENG 2010: American Literature II

Description

Surveys the emergence of modern American literature from the latter half of the 19th century through the social challenges experienced in the 20th century before and after World Wars I and II, and into the postmodern era that ushered in the 21st century.

Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate critical thinking and rhetorical analysis skills through literature critiques.
  2. Explain cultural, historical, and philosophical forces that impact American literary texts.
  3. Examine allusion, figurative language, and other rhetorical devices used in American literature.
  4. Analyze theme in a variety of American literary contexts.
  5. Analyze rhetorical elements of American literature in themes related to universal human concerns and other provocative subjects.
  6. Examine the cultural and philosophical foundations in American literary history.
  7. Analyze scholarly research in support of a thesis related to American literature.
  8. Apply library research skills and information literacy through American literature critiques.

Prerequisites

None

Textbook(s)

Integrated Learning Resource

Publisher: (No information available)
Author: (No information available)
ISBN: (No information available)
Price: (No information available)

* Disclaimer: Textbooks listed are based on the last open revision of the course. Prior revisions and future revisions may use different textbooks. To verify textbook information, view the course syllabus or contact Student Services at students@waldorf.edu