HIS 3630


A survey of African American history from the trans-Atlantic slave trade to the present, with a special emphasis on the Black struggle for freedom, this course considers how the analysis of cultural, intellectual, and political artifacts shape narratives about the experience of African Americans and their role in the development of American democracy and culture.


  1. Deploy historical analysis of text, image, audio and visual media, and other primary artifacts to frame significant developments in African American history from 1600 to the present.
  2. Delineate the varied philosophical approaches and political strategies of influential individuals and organizations in different reform eras.
  3. Examine the evolution of key African American movements and their contributions to the development of American civil rights and democratic institutions.
  4. Evaluate the role of literature and arts created by African Americans in their development and their contribution to American politics and culture.
  5. Describe the significance and process of memorialization and memory in shaping narratives about African-American history.
  6. Articulate a position supported by the use of primary and secondary sources related to African American history.
  7. Characterize how relationships among race, economics, politics, and natural history or natural science informed and influenced the development of slavery and equality.
  8. Delineate the impact of selectivity on historical narratives, including courses, on equality.





* Disclaimer: Textbooks listed are based on the last open revision of the course. Prior revisions and future revisions may use different textbooks. To verify textbook information, view the course syllabus or contact Student Services at students@waldorf.edu