Curriculum & Courses

Prefix Number Course Credit
Hours

English Core Courses

 
ENG 110 Introduction to Literary Studies 3
ENG 230 Advanced Composition 3
CWR 201 Introduction to Creative Writing 3
ENG 355 Shakespeare 3
Students will choose two of these courses:
ENG 350 The Hero in Early British Literature 3
ENG 360 Romantic Literature 3
ENG 365 Victorian Literature 3
ENG 373 British Literature from Modern to Contemporary 3
ENG 415 Special Topics in Literature and Language 3
Students will choose one of these courses:
ENG 212 Global Literature 3
ENG 213 Postcolonial Global Literature 3
ENG 470 Vietnam Era 3
ENG 415 Special Topics in Literature and Language 3
ENG 200+ Electives 6
    Electives (ENG, COM, or CWR) 6
ENG   Internship or Senior Thesis 3

All English majors except English secondary education majors must complete the humanities minor or two minors in humanities fields (theatre, history, Shakespeare, etc.). An English major seeking a minor in creative writing must take CWR 201 and an upper-level creative writing course as part of the English major requirements, plus three more creative writing courses in different genres for the minor. These three courses cannot be used as English major elective courses.

       

English Education Core Courses

 
ENG 110 Introduction to Literary Studies 3
ENG 204 Writing Center Tutor Training 2
ENG 230 Advanced Composition 3
ENG 305 English Grammar 3
ENG 310 Young Adult Literature 3
ENG 355 Shakespeare 3
CWR 201 Introduction to Creative Writing 3
SPE 355 Essentials of Public Speaking 3
Students will choose one of these courses:
ENG 212 Global Literature 3
ENG 213 Postcolonial Global Literature 3
ENG 470 Vietnam Era 3
ENG 415 Special Topics in Literature and Language 3
Students will choose two of these courses:
ENG 350 The Hero in Early British Literature 3
ENG 360 Romantic Literature 3
ENG 365 Victorian Literature 3
ENG 373 British Literature from Modern to Contemporary 3
ENG 415 Special Topics in Literature and Language 3
Students will choose two of these courses:
ENG 323 American Literature of the Frontier 3
ENG 327 American Renaissance 3
ENG 333 American Realism 3
ENG 337 American Literature from Modernism to Memoir 3
ENG 415 Special Topics in Literature and Language 3
       

English Minor Courses

 
ENG/CWR 110+ Electives 18
  110+ Electives (ENG, CWR, or related field) 3

Suggested Curriculum

English

   

Semester I

English 101/106, (3 cr.)
Critical Inquiry 111, (3 cr.)
Foreign Language Elective (4 cr.)
Wellness 101, (1 cr.)
Math 101 (or higher), (4 cr.)
Phy. Ed. Elective, (.5 cr.)
Total of 15.5

Semester II

English 110, (3 cr.)
Artistic Expression 120, (3 cr.)
Foreign Language Elective, (4 cr.)
Religion 103, (3 cr.)
History Elective, (3 cr.)
Writing Center Tutor Training 204, (1 cr.)
Total of 17

Semester III

Investigations in Humanities 300, (3 cr.)
Creative Writing 201, (3 cr.)
Religion Elective, (3 cr.)
Lab Science, (4 cr.)
American or British Lit., (3 cr.)
Total of 16

Semester IV

Advanced Composition 230, (3 cr.)
American or British Lit., (3 cr.)
Humanities Minor Elective, (3 cr.)
Social Science Elective, (3 cr.)
Creative Writing or English Elective, (3 cr.)
Total of 15

Semester V

Speech 111 or Acting 132, (3 cr.)
British or American Lit., (3 cr.)
Social Science Elective, (3 cr.)
Global Literature 212, (3 cr.)
Humanities Minor Elective, (3 cr.)
Total of 15

Semester VI

Shakespeare 355, (3 cr.)
British or American Lit., (3 cr.)
Humanities Minor Elective, (3 cr.)
Social Science Elective, (3 cr.)
Elective, (3 cr.)
Phy. Ed. Elective, (.5 cr.)
Total of 15

Semester VII

British or American Lit., (3 cr.)
English Elective, (3 cr.)
Humanities Minor Elective, (3 cr.)
Religion Elective 300+, (3 cr.)
Elective, (3 cr.)
Total of 15

Semester VIII

British or American Lit., (3 cr.)
English Elective, (3 cr.)
Senior Thesis/Internship 495/499, (3 cr.)
Electives, (6 cr.)
Total of 15


English Education

   

Semester I

English 101/106, (3 cr.)
Religion 103, (3 cr.)
Critical Inquiry 111, (3 cr.)
Human Growth 144, (3 cr.)
Math Elective, (4 cr.)
Total of 16

Semester II

English 110, (3 cr.)
Speech 111, (3 cr.)
Artistic Expression 120, (3 cr.)
Human Relations 210, (2 cr.)
History Elective, (3 cr.)
Wellness 101, (1 cr.)
Total of 15

Semester III

Creative Writing 201, (3 cr.)
Educational Psychology 240, (3 cr.)
Phy. Ed. Electives, (1 cr.)
American or British Lit., (3 cr.)
Advanced Composition 230, (3 cr.)
Ed. Media 230, (1 cr.)
Total of 14

Semester IV

Intro. to Teaching 201/202, (3 cr.)
English Grammar 305, (3 cr.)
Exceptional Learners 220, (3 cr.)
Lab Science Elective, (4 cr.)
British or American Lit., (3 cr.)
Total of 16

Semester V

Religion 200+, (3 cr.)
Young Adult Lit. 310, (3 cr.)
Social Science Elective, (3 cr.)
Global Literature Course, (3 cr.)
Total of 15

Semester VI

Shakespeare 355, (3 cr.)
Ethics and Religious Diversity 400, (3 cr.)
Secondary Methods 370, (2 cr.)
Clinical Teaching Experience 371, (1 cr.)
British or American Lit., (3 cr.)
Assessment 440, (3 cr.)
Writing Center Tutor Training 204, (1 cr.)
Total of 16

Semester VII

Behavior Management 465, (2 cr.)
Teaching English Methods 385, (3 cr.)
Teaching English Clinical 386, (1 cr.)
British or American Lit., (3 cr.)
Content Area Reading 395, (2 cr.)
Elective, (3 cr.)
Total of 14

Semester VIII

5-9 Student Teaching 415, (6 cr.)
9-12 Student Teaching 417, (6 cr.)
Capstone 430, (1 cr.)
Multiculutral/Inclusive 411 (May Term), (2 cr.)
Total of 15


English Course Descriptions

ENG 100 Introduction to College Writing (3 cr.)

This course is designed to help students bring their writing skills to a level desirable for college courses and English 101. Content development, writing style, sentence structures, grammar, organization of thought, and revision are central to the course. Student-teacher and peer conferencing is encouraged. Incoming freshmen with an ACT score of less than 19 on either the English of Reading portions of the ACT or with a SAT score of less than 470 on the Reading portion of the SAT should be placed in English 100. Exceptions can be made by the Registrar on a case by case basis.

ENG 101 First-Year Composition (3 cr.)

This course focuses on the composing process. Students will write several essays, one or more of which will include practice in research. Student-teacher and/or peer conferencing is encouraged, as is student use of the writing center.

ENG 102 Introduction to Literature (3 cr.)

Students will practice various critical approaches in their written responses to short stories, plays, poems, and often a novel. Journal responses to literature are also encouraged. (Prerequisites: ENG 101/106)

ENG 106 Honors Seminar I: Composition (3 cr.)

This honors level course in academic literacy focuses on college writing, critical thinking, and active reading. Students develop their abilities to analyze source texts, synthesize ideas, and advance arguments in writing. Reading-to-write is emphasized in a syllabus of classic and contemporary texts. (Open to students accepted into the Honors College Program) 

ENG 107 Honors Seminar II: Literature and Composition (3 cr.)

This course focuses on the critical reading of literary texts from a variety of genres, times, and voices. Class discussion and writing projects provide opportunity for analysis, synthesis, and interpretation of the texts as students develop increasing academic literacy. (Open to students in the Honors College Program) (Prerequisites: ENG 101/106)

ENG 110 Introduction to Literary Studies (3 cr.)

Fiction, drama, and poetry will be discussed in this intensive introduction to literature. Literary terminology, techniques for writing about literature, a brief literary history of British and American literature, and a basic introduction to literary theory will be covered. This course is required for all English, English Secondary Education, and Creative Writing majors and can be substituted for the English 102/107 general education core requirement. (Prerequisites: ENG 101/106)

ENG 204 Writing Center Tutor Training (2 cr.)

The course focuses on current theories of composition, teacher response, instructional techniques for writing conferences, and writing center theories and practices. (Prerequisites: ENG 101/106 and consent of instructor)

ENG 212 Global Literature (3 cr.)

This course focuses on writing about and discussing literature from outside the United States or England. The content of the course varies from semester to semester and may survey a particular time period and/or region; explore a genre of literature across times or regions; or thematically investigate world literatures. (Prerequisites: ENG 102/107/110 or consent of the instructor)

ENG 213 Postcolonial Global Literature (3 cr.)

This course will explore the global literature (non-British/non-American) that developed in a variety of geographical areas following decolonization. Readings, writing, and discussion will focus on how these writers and their works, both fiction and non-fiction, help give voice to those cultures and nations previously marginalized through colonization. In this context, we will examine issues and ideas that surface as these nations and peoples move from colonized to independent and seek to find ways to blend their old and new cultural experiences by expressing change, conflict, and growth through the literature that records this experience. (Prerequisites: ENG 102/107/110)

ENG 230 Advanced Composition (3 cr.)

This composition course builds on the writing process skills acquired in English 101, with a particular focus on essay form and the rhetorical aims of written argument, including inquiry, persuasion, mediation, and research-based argument. Students will read, analyze, and write a variety of essays in order to develop a full understanding of the essay form. Required for English, English Secondary Education, and Creative Writing majors. (Prerequisites: ENG 101/106)

ENG 235 Technical Communications (3 cr.)

This course focuses on writing within technical, scientific and professional contexts. Over the courses of the semester, students will gain experience writing technical and/or scientific reports, completing workplace correspondence, writing procedures/instructions, and presenting technical topics to non-technical readers/users. Students will review and practice research documentation, including exposure to the appropriate style(s) for their chosen discipline. Course work will focus both on print and online contexts.

ENG 305 English Grammar (3 cr.)

This course provides a thorough examination of English syntax and its underlying structures, specifically to gain understanding of the rules of the written form of American Standard English. Special attention will also be given to how the English language is actively evolving and changing. Required for secondary education English majors. (Prerequisite: ENG 101)

ENG 310 Young Adult Literature (3 cr.)

This course will provide an opportunity for English certification majors to survey books in a variety of genres which are of interest to middle school and high school students with special attention to the developmental needs and abilities of students of this age, including gifted learners and reluctant readers. Required for secondary education English majors. (Prerequisites: ENG 102/107/110)

ENG 323 American Literature of the Frontier (3 cr.)

This course will examine the frontier as a place and idea in early American Literature. Students will read novels ranging from traditional frontier narratives such as James Fenimore Cooper’s Leatherstocking Tales to captivity narratives such as Lydia Marie Child’s Hobomok. This course will explore in what ways the experience, landscape, and myth of the frontier shaped American Literature and culture. (Prerequisites: ENG 102/107/110)

ENG 327 American Renaissance (3 cr.)

This course will explore the literature of the American Renaissance, a period of amazing artistic and intellectual growth. Students will read authors ranging from Emerson to Alcott, Melville to Dickinson, Hawthorne to Fuller. These authors were particularly interested in creating a literature that was distinctively American. Particular emphasis will be placed on the influence of transcendentalism on these authors and their works. (Prerequisites: ENG 102/107/110)

ENG 333 American Realism (3 cr.)

This course will examine the influence of capitalism, industrialism, and urban growth on nineteenth-century American literature. (Prerequisites: ENG 102/107/110)

ENG 337 American Literature from Modernism to Memoir (3 cr.)

This course will investigate the origins, objectives, and methods of the Modern and Post modern movements in American Literature as well as explore the diversity of voices and genres contributing to the contemporary American scene. Special attention will be paid to cultural, political, and social issues as they influence and are influenced by this literature. (Prerequisites: ENG 102/107/110)

ENG 350 The Hero in Early British Literature (3 cr.)

The survey of early British literature ranges from Beowulf, one of the earliest old English texts, up to the eighteenth century. We will trace the development of the literary hero as well as focus upon literary history and genre development as we study such authors as Chaucer, Milton, Donne, and Swift. (Prerequisites: ENG 102/107/110)

ENG 355 Shakespeare (3 cr.)

Using literary criticism and close textual analysis, this course will examine several of Shakespeare’s plays, representing the dramatic genres of comedy, history, tragedy, and romance. (Prerequisites: ENG 102/107/110)

ENG 360 Romantic Literature (3 cr.)

This course covers the Romantic era of British Literature, 1780-1830, a time of great social change stemming from industrialism, revolutionary ideas from France and elsewhere, innovations in art and music, and a new, more individualized poetic voice. In this context, we will examine journals, novels, poetry, and essays by such authors as Dorothy and William Wordsworth, Jane Austen, Percy and Mary Shelley, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Emily Brontë. (Prerequisites: ENG 102/107/110)

ENG 365 Victorian Literature (3 cr.)

From serialized novels by Hardy and Dickens to poetry by Tennyson and Brownings, this course will cover the 1830-1900 Victorian periods of British literature, as well as such influences as the rising middle class, improving education and working conditions, and expanded rights for women. (Prerequisites: ENG 102/107/110)

ENG 373 British Literature from Modern to Contemporary (3 cr.)

Modern British Literature (early 20th century through WWII) to literature of the Contemporary period (WWII to the present) will be covered in this course, along with an examination of the aesthetic, philosophical, and cultural contexts of the era. (Prerequisites: ENG 102/107/110)

ENG 415 Special Topics in Literature and Language (3 cr.)

Topics will vary and are determined by the instructor. The class will examine an individual author, literary genre, or historical time period. (Prerequisite: ENG 102/107/110)

ENG/HIS 470 Vietnam Era (3 cr.)

This class centers on the American involvement in Southeast Asia from 1965 to 1972 through the disciplines of history and English. It also covers to a lesser degree the French colonial experience in Indo-China and the history of the united Vietnam after reunification in 1975. As an interdisciplinary course, the focus is not only on the historical narrative but on the literature of the period as well from American, South Vietnamese, and North Vietnamese sources. Film, music, and direct recollections of the US Vietnam veterans are used in the course.

ENG/HIS 471 From the Beats to the Beatles (3 cr.)

This interdisciplinary course will examine American counterculture, political activism, and postmodern literature after 1945.

ENG 495 Internship

ENG/THR 498 Shakespeare Thesis (3 cr.)

Thesis projects synthesizing literary, historical, biographical, and theatrical elements of plays of Shakespeare and/or early modern dramatists. An advisor from the English or Theatre departments must be assigned as an advisor for this thesis project. Further guidelines for the thesis are available from the Theatre Department. Students will present research/project at Inquirere colloquium.

ENG 499 Senior Thesis 


Speech Course Descriptions

SPE 111 Essentials of Public Speaking (3 cr.)

Fundamentals of effective speaking, emphasizing techniques, and theories of organization and delivery and the practical application of these in various formal and informal speaking situations.

SPE/POL 300 Argumentation and Debate (3 cr.)

This course is designed to improve critical thinking and argumentation skills. The student will learn to construct, apply, and rebut arguments through the discipline of academic debate. The student will develop the ability to apply these skills in a variety of communication situations (business, legal, personal). The course also prepares the student to direct and manage or judge a high school debate team.